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Indonesia

Articles by Indonesia

IPPF's Member Association IPPA in Advocacy Action
13 April 2022

Indonesia Passes Long Awaited Bill Towards Eliminating Sexual Violence

12 April 2022: Indonesia has passed the sexual violence bill into law a decade after it was first proposed. The final draft of the law criminalises physical sexual abuse, both in marriage and outside, sexual exploitation, forced marriage, including child marriage, and circulating non-consensual sexual content, amongst others. It also stipulates that a court must compel convicted abusers to pay restitution and authorities to provide counselling to victims. Perkumpulan Keluarga Berencana Indonesia (PKBI) (also known as the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA)), IPPF member in Indonesia, has been actively advocating for this bill since 2017 and has been part of the formal drafting of the bill in the past two (2) years. Eko Maryadi, PKBI’s Executive Director offered these words, “Congratulations to the PKBI Advocacy Team who consistently guarded the draft Bill until it became the Criminal Acts of Sexual Violence Law. The struggle is not over. We still must oversee the operationalisation of the law, and our advocacy and the fight against sexual violence will not stop until it does.” “We welcome the passing of the sexual violence bill in Indonesia and congratulate PKBI, Komnas Perempuan and countless activists and advocates in Indonesia for your tireless fight to ensure all people are safe from sexual and gender-based violence, and survivors have access to justice and support. This is a great win for the sexual and reproductive rights of all Indonesians, especially women and girls”, said Tomoko Fukuda, IPPF ESEAOR Regional Director.

Philippines - SPRINT
31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

  The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies. In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis. You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here. Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)  Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

IPPF Japan Trust Fund
30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.      

image of a girl smiling
26 January 2017

Overprotected and Underserved: The Influence of Law on Young People’s Access to Sexual & Reproductive Health in Indonesia

Youth in Indonesia are faced with challenges when it comes to accessing sexual reproductive health and rights. Particularly unmarried youth are marred with barriers and restrictions in accessing sexual and reproductive health services. Hence, IPPF ESEAOR commissioned a study in Indonesia specifically to determine the impact of law on youth’s access to sexual and reproductive health services in Indonesia. This study found that several laws and regulations directly affect youth’s access to SRH services in Indonesia; in particular, laws regulating access to contraceptives and abortion services. Articles 72 and 78 of the Health Law, as well as Articles 21, 24 and 25 of the Population and Family Development Law provide that contraceptives and family-planning services are intended for legally married couples. This study explored youth’s and health service providers’ knowledge, perceptions and understanding of various areas of law; and how these affects young people’s access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Indonesia. To achieve these objectives, the researcher employed several methodological approaches, including a desk-based review of existing laws, regulations, and policies on SRH in Indonesia, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods of in-country primary data collection and analysis. The methodology for this research draws and expands upon a pilot multi-country study conducted by Coram International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation in El Salvador, Senegal, and the United Kingdom in 2012 - 2013. IPPF ESEAOR and our Member Associations will use the evidence generated to inform our SRHR advocacy efforts. The analysis will be used with policymakers to advocate for changes to the legal system, to expand instead of restricting access, to all youth. The research will also guide the content of our youth programming, to address misunderstandings about SRHR and the law, and empower youth to advocate for a youth-friendly SRHR environment.

Girls Decide landing image
30 June 2016

Girls Decide

This programme addresses critical challenges faced by young women around sexual health and sexuality. It has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support research, awareness-raising, advocacy and service delivery.    Girls Decide is about the sexual and reproductive health and rights of girls and young women. Around the world, girls aged 10 to 19 account for 23% of all disease associated with pregnancy and childbirth. An estimated 2.5 million have unsafe abortions every year. Worldwide, young women account for 60% of the 5.5 million young people living with HIV and/or AIDS. Girls Decide has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support work to improve sexual health and rights for girls and young women. These include a series of films on sexual and reproductive health decisions faced by 6 young women in 6 different countries. The films won the prestigious International Video and Communications Award (IVCA). When girls and young women have access to critical lifesaving services and information, and when they are able to make meaningful choices about their life path, they are empowered. Their quality of life improves, as does the well-being of their families and the communities in which they live. Their collective ability to achieve internationally agreed development goals is strengthened. Almost all IPPF Member Associations provide services to young people and 1 in every 3 clients is a young person below the age of 25. All young women and girls are rights-holders and are entitled to sexual and reproductive rights. As a matter of principle, the IPPF Secretariat and Member Associations stand by girls by respecting and fulfilling their right to high quality services; they stand up for girls by supporting them in making their own decisions related to sexuality and pregnancy; they stand for sexual and reproductive rights by addressing the challenges faced by young women and girls at local, national and international levels.

Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association

In 1957 the Indonesian planned parenthood association (IPPA) was established with the aim of realizing responsible parenthood believing that family is the main pillar in realizing community welfare. Responsible parenthood is understood and interpreted through the dimensions of birth, education, health, welfare and the future.

Values:

  • Respect human dignity, regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital status, people with HIV, people living with disabilities, religion, race, ethnicity, political orientation, social and economic status.
  • Upholding the values of democracy, non-discrimination, gender equality and justice, social justice, personal autonomy, freedom of thought, opinion, expression and association.
  • Upholding and mainstreaming sexual and reproductive health rights in all situations and opportunities.
  • Stick to volunteerism, pioneering work, professionalism, trustworthiness, transparency, independence, sustainability and justice.

Vision:

  • Responsible and inclusive Indonesian family and society.

Mission:

  • Empowering the community to create a responsible family.
  • Building an inclusive youth movement.
  • Providing comprehensive, professional and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.
  • Influencing and empowering policy makers to respect, protect, and fulfil SRHR.
  • Develop a professional organization to achieve independence and sustainability.
IPPF's Member Association IPPA in Advocacy Action
13 April 2022

Indonesia Passes Long Awaited Bill Towards Eliminating Sexual Violence

12 April 2022: Indonesia has passed the sexual violence bill into law a decade after it was first proposed. The final draft of the law criminalises physical sexual abuse, both in marriage and outside, sexual exploitation, forced marriage, including child marriage, and circulating non-consensual sexual content, amongst others. It also stipulates that a court must compel convicted abusers to pay restitution and authorities to provide counselling to victims. Perkumpulan Keluarga Berencana Indonesia (PKBI) (also known as the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA)), IPPF member in Indonesia, has been actively advocating for this bill since 2017 and has been part of the formal drafting of the bill in the past two (2) years. Eko Maryadi, PKBI’s Executive Director offered these words, “Congratulations to the PKBI Advocacy Team who consistently guarded the draft Bill until it became the Criminal Acts of Sexual Violence Law. The struggle is not over. We still must oversee the operationalisation of the law, and our advocacy and the fight against sexual violence will not stop until it does.” “We welcome the passing of the sexual violence bill in Indonesia and congratulate PKBI, Komnas Perempuan and countless activists and advocates in Indonesia for your tireless fight to ensure all people are safe from sexual and gender-based violence, and survivors have access to justice and support. This is a great win for the sexual and reproductive rights of all Indonesians, especially women and girls”, said Tomoko Fukuda, IPPF ESEAOR Regional Director.

Philippines - SPRINT
31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

  The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies. In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis. You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here. Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)  Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

IPPF Japan Trust Fund
30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.      

image of a girl smiling
26 January 2017

Overprotected and Underserved: The Influence of Law on Young People’s Access to Sexual & Reproductive Health in Indonesia

Youth in Indonesia are faced with challenges when it comes to accessing sexual reproductive health and rights. Particularly unmarried youth are marred with barriers and restrictions in accessing sexual and reproductive health services. Hence, IPPF ESEAOR commissioned a study in Indonesia specifically to determine the impact of law on youth’s access to sexual and reproductive health services in Indonesia. This study found that several laws and regulations directly affect youth’s access to SRH services in Indonesia; in particular, laws regulating access to contraceptives and abortion services. Articles 72 and 78 of the Health Law, as well as Articles 21, 24 and 25 of the Population and Family Development Law provide that contraceptives and family-planning services are intended for legally married couples. This study explored youth’s and health service providers’ knowledge, perceptions and understanding of various areas of law; and how these affects young people’s access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Indonesia. To achieve these objectives, the researcher employed several methodological approaches, including a desk-based review of existing laws, regulations, and policies on SRH in Indonesia, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods of in-country primary data collection and analysis. The methodology for this research draws and expands upon a pilot multi-country study conducted by Coram International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation in El Salvador, Senegal, and the United Kingdom in 2012 - 2013. IPPF ESEAOR and our Member Associations will use the evidence generated to inform our SRHR advocacy efforts. The analysis will be used with policymakers to advocate for changes to the legal system, to expand instead of restricting access, to all youth. The research will also guide the content of our youth programming, to address misunderstandings about SRHR and the law, and empower youth to advocate for a youth-friendly SRHR environment.

Girls Decide landing image
30 June 2016

Girls Decide

This programme addresses critical challenges faced by young women around sexual health and sexuality. It has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support research, awareness-raising, advocacy and service delivery.    Girls Decide is about the sexual and reproductive health and rights of girls and young women. Around the world, girls aged 10 to 19 account for 23% of all disease associated with pregnancy and childbirth. An estimated 2.5 million have unsafe abortions every year. Worldwide, young women account for 60% of the 5.5 million young people living with HIV and/or AIDS. Girls Decide has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support work to improve sexual health and rights for girls and young women. These include a series of films on sexual and reproductive health decisions faced by 6 young women in 6 different countries. The films won the prestigious International Video and Communications Award (IVCA). When girls and young women have access to critical lifesaving services and information, and when they are able to make meaningful choices about their life path, they are empowered. Their quality of life improves, as does the well-being of their families and the communities in which they live. Their collective ability to achieve internationally agreed development goals is strengthened. Almost all IPPF Member Associations provide services to young people and 1 in every 3 clients is a young person below the age of 25. All young women and girls are rights-holders and are entitled to sexual and reproductive rights. As a matter of principle, the IPPF Secretariat and Member Associations stand by girls by respecting and fulfilling their right to high quality services; they stand up for girls by supporting them in making their own decisions related to sexuality and pregnancy; they stand for sexual and reproductive rights by addressing the challenges faced by young women and girls at local, national and international levels.

Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association

In 1957 the Indonesian planned parenthood association (IPPA) was established with the aim of realizing responsible parenthood believing that family is the main pillar in realizing community welfare. Responsible parenthood is understood and interpreted through the dimensions of birth, education, health, welfare and the future.

Values:

  • Respect human dignity, regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital status, people with HIV, people living with disabilities, religion, race, ethnicity, political orientation, social and economic status.
  • Upholding the values of democracy, non-discrimination, gender equality and justice, social justice, personal autonomy, freedom of thought, opinion, expression and association.
  • Upholding and mainstreaming sexual and reproductive health rights in all situations and opportunities.
  • Stick to volunteerism, pioneering work, professionalism, trustworthiness, transparency, independence, sustainability and justice.

Vision:

  • Responsible and inclusive Indonesian family and society.

Mission:

  • Empowering the community to create a responsible family.
  • Building an inclusive youth movement.
  • Providing comprehensive, professional and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.
  • Influencing and empowering policy makers to respect, protect, and fulfil SRHR.
  • Develop a professional organization to achieve independence and sustainability.