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A selection of news from across the Federation

IPPF's Member Association IPPA in Advocacy Action

Indonesia

News item

Indonesia Passes Long Awaited Bill Towards Eliminating Sexual Violence

12 April 2022: Indonesia has passed the sexual violence bill into law a decade after it was first proposed. The final draft of the law criminalises physical sexual abuse, both in marriage and outside, sexual exploitation, forced marriage, including child marriage, and circulating non-consensual sexual content, amongst others. It also stipulates that a court must compel convicted abusers to pay restitution and authorities to provide counselling to victims.

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IPPF contraception supply disrupted
news item

| 16 April 2020

Contraception and COVID-19: Disrupted supply and access

Globally, the unmet need for contraception remains too high. It’s estimated that 214 million women and girls are not using modern contraception, despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. And this was before the COVID-19 pandemic, which is set to further derail access to contraception for women and girls around the world. Disrupted supply chains Lockdown measures taken globally to respond to COVID-19 are bringing major disruptions to contraceptive supply chains. Large manufacturers of contraceptives in Asia have had to halt production or operate at reduced capacity, and we may see similar developments in other regions as COVID-19 takes hold. For example, the world’s largest condom producer – Malaysia’s Karex Bhd – which makes one in every five condoms globally, was forced to close for a week in March and only given permission to reopen at 50% capacity. Production of IUDs in India – a major global producer of IUDs – has come to a standstill with the Indian government also curtailing export of any product containing progesterone, a key component of a number of contraceptives. In addition to this, the closures of borders and other restrictions imposed in the face of COVID-19 further affect the shipping and distribution of commodities. Delays in the production and delivery of contraceptive supplies at global and national levels will lead to stockouts of supplies, severely impacting contraceptive access. Disrupted access Beyond this, at country level, sexual and reproductive health services, staffing and funds may be diverted to support COVID-19 responses, leaving women and girls unable to access contraceptive and other sexual and reproductive health care. Provision of sexual and reproductive health services will also be affected by infection prevention measures, including health workers’ access to personal protective equipment (PPE). Yet, this is just part of the picture. Even where contraceptives are available and continue to be provided through clinics or pharmacies, the impact of COVID-19 on women’s and girls’ lives will curtail their access in multiple other ways. Quarantine measures and mobility restrictions will affect women’s and girls’ ability to seek out contraceptive services. Financial insecurity and additional caregiving burdens brought on by lockdown measures will be further impediments. Marginalized populations will face additional barriers. What’s the impact for our clinics on the ground? In 2018, we delivered 81.2 million contraceptive services and distributed over 300 million condoms through our Member Associations (MAs). Contraceptive care, either through clinics or outreach programs, makes up the largest portion of our service provision to communities by far. Now, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are receiving concerning updates from our MAs who are worried about impacts on supply chains and their ability to operate. 5,633 static and mobile clinics and community-based care outlets have already closed because of the outbreak, across 64 countries. They make up 14% of the total service delivery points IPPF members ran in 2018. For MAs that are still running limited services, an immediate need is PPE. Where does this leave us? At IPPF, supporting all our MAs through this pandemic is our priority. We are working to understand the stresses being placed on our MAs and to deliver as much direct support as possible. We actively monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the supply of contraceptives and other sexual and reproductive health commodities, and work with partners and manufacturers to do what we can to meet MAs’ needs – including for PPE – and ensure continued availability of supplies. We are also working to identify opportunities to modernize our service offering to respond to the rapidly changing landscape, with a view to expanding no touch and digital services and self-management of care, and make a strong case for additional resourcing in these challenging times. And we are calling on others – national governments, donors and international agencies – to recognize sexual and reproductive healthcare, including contraceptive services, as essential in this crisis, and to take measures to address disruptions in supply chains and ensure continued service provision at national level. If women, girls and marginalized communities cannot access contraceptive care in this crisis, we can expect to see a rise in unintended and forced pregnancies, an increase in sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and, ultimately, a sharp rise in unsafe abortions. The impacts on women’s and girls’ lives now, and beyond this crisis, will be severe.

IPPF contraception supply disrupted
news_item

| 16 April 2020

Contraception and COVID-19: Disrupted supply and access

Globally, the unmet need for contraception remains too high. It’s estimated that 214 million women and girls are not using modern contraception, despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. And this was before the COVID-19 pandemic, which is set to further derail access to contraception for women and girls around the world. Disrupted supply chains Lockdown measures taken globally to respond to COVID-19 are bringing major disruptions to contraceptive supply chains. Large manufacturers of contraceptives in Asia have had to halt production or operate at reduced capacity, and we may see similar developments in other regions as COVID-19 takes hold. For example, the world’s largest condom producer – Malaysia’s Karex Bhd – which makes one in every five condoms globally, was forced to close for a week in March and only given permission to reopen at 50% capacity. Production of IUDs in India – a major global producer of IUDs – has come to a standstill with the Indian government also curtailing export of any product containing progesterone, a key component of a number of contraceptives. In addition to this, the closures of borders and other restrictions imposed in the face of COVID-19 further affect the shipping and distribution of commodities. Delays in the production and delivery of contraceptive supplies at global and national levels will lead to stockouts of supplies, severely impacting contraceptive access. Disrupted access Beyond this, at country level, sexual and reproductive health services, staffing and funds may be diverted to support COVID-19 responses, leaving women and girls unable to access contraceptive and other sexual and reproductive health care. Provision of sexual and reproductive health services will also be affected by infection prevention measures, including health workers’ access to personal protective equipment (PPE). Yet, this is just part of the picture. Even where contraceptives are available and continue to be provided through clinics or pharmacies, the impact of COVID-19 on women’s and girls’ lives will curtail their access in multiple other ways. Quarantine measures and mobility restrictions will affect women’s and girls’ ability to seek out contraceptive services. Financial insecurity and additional caregiving burdens brought on by lockdown measures will be further impediments. Marginalized populations will face additional barriers. What’s the impact for our clinics on the ground? In 2018, we delivered 81.2 million contraceptive services and distributed over 300 million condoms through our Member Associations (MAs). Contraceptive care, either through clinics or outreach programs, makes up the largest portion of our service provision to communities by far. Now, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are receiving concerning updates from our MAs who are worried about impacts on supply chains and their ability to operate. 5,633 static and mobile clinics and community-based care outlets have already closed because of the outbreak, across 64 countries. They make up 14% of the total service delivery points IPPF members ran in 2018. For MAs that are still running limited services, an immediate need is PPE. Where does this leave us? At IPPF, supporting all our MAs through this pandemic is our priority. We are working to understand the stresses being placed on our MAs and to deliver as much direct support as possible. We actively monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the supply of contraceptives and other sexual and reproductive health commodities, and work with partners and manufacturers to do what we can to meet MAs’ needs – including for PPE – and ensure continued availability of supplies. We are also working to identify opportunities to modernize our service offering to respond to the rapidly changing landscape, with a view to expanding no touch and digital services and self-management of care, and make a strong case for additional resourcing in these challenging times. And we are calling on others – national governments, donors and international agencies – to recognize sexual and reproductive healthcare, including contraceptive services, as essential in this crisis, and to take measures to address disruptions in supply chains and ensure continued service provision at national level. If women, girls and marginalized communities cannot access contraceptive care in this crisis, we can expect to see a rise in unintended and forced pregnancies, an increase in sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and, ultimately, a sharp rise in unsafe abortions. The impacts on women’s and girls’ lives now, and beyond this crisis, will be severe.

Contraceptives counseling in SIPPA clinic
news item

| 28 June 2017

SIPPA appointed as CSO Focal Point for FP2020

The Solomon Islands government took a significant step in addressing the family planning service delivery programme in the country by strengthening partnership with the civil society. In its latest move, the Ministry of Health and Medical Services tapped Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association (SIPPA), an IPPF member association, to be the CSO focal point to help mobilize the civil society sector towards the achievement of Solomon Islands’ FP2020 target. The Solomon Islands failed to reach the national target for contraceptive rate set in 2015. The target of 55% CPR is double the current rate of 27% which has stayed at that rate for about a decade. The high unmet need can be attributed to various factors, which include: young people’s lack of information to make the right choices; women, men, and youth’s lack of access to FP services and commodities; lack of skilled staff and health service providers. By bringing SIPPA into the action, the Government of Solomon Islands will benefit from IPPF’s and SIPPA’s strong youth program, data collection, management, and analysis infrastructure, and technical expertise in comprehensive sexuality education and HIV/STI program. The commitments made on behalf of the Government of Solomon Islands on July 11, 2012 are (1) to make family planning a priority under the reproductive health program section of the government National Health Strategic Plan for 2006-2015 and (2) to make men partners in all reproductive health issues, including voluntary family planning.  

Contraceptives counseling in SIPPA clinic
news_item

| 28 June 2017

SIPPA appointed as CSO Focal Point for FP2020

The Solomon Islands government took a significant step in addressing the family planning service delivery programme in the country by strengthening partnership with the civil society. In its latest move, the Ministry of Health and Medical Services tapped Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association (SIPPA), an IPPF member association, to be the CSO focal point to help mobilize the civil society sector towards the achievement of Solomon Islands’ FP2020 target. The Solomon Islands failed to reach the national target for contraceptive rate set in 2015. The target of 55% CPR is double the current rate of 27% which has stayed at that rate for about a decade. The high unmet need can be attributed to various factors, which include: young people’s lack of information to make the right choices; women, men, and youth’s lack of access to FP services and commodities; lack of skilled staff and health service providers. By bringing SIPPA into the action, the Government of Solomon Islands will benefit from IPPF’s and SIPPA’s strong youth program, data collection, management, and analysis infrastructure, and technical expertise in comprehensive sexuality education and HIV/STI program. The commitments made on behalf of the Government of Solomon Islands on July 11, 2012 are (1) to make family planning a priority under the reproductive health program section of the government National Health Strategic Plan for 2006-2015 and (2) to make men partners in all reproductive health issues, including voluntary family planning.  

vanuatu
news item

| 27 August 2015

Cyclone Pam hits The Happiest Place on Earth: Humanitarian Mission to Vanuatu Open Primary tabs configuration options Primary tabs

The Happy Planet Index has declared Vanuatu Archipelago ‘the happiest place on earth’ with its picturesque shoreline and friendly people. But unfortunately, Vanuatu - the Land Eternal- is a country with one of the highest disaster risks in the world. On Friday 13th of March 2015 cyclone PAM hit Vanuatu's southern provinces of Shefa and Tafea, causing widespread devastation. International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), through its SPRINT initiative (supported by DFAT of Australian government), immediately responded providing life-saving reproductive health services with the help of its Member Association- Vanuatu Family Health Association (VFHA). The VFHA team, with Vanuatu Ministry of Health and United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), established medical and reproductive health camps in the islands (North Tanna, Epi, North Efate) and remote villages. After the cyclone struck, the island people were left without any access to healthcare, leaving pregnant women especially vulnerable. Around the world, it is estimated that 60% of maternal deaths and 45% of newborn deaths take place in fragile contexts. So, many of these Vanuatu women and their babies are at high risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, violence against women and girls is a growing social and economic issue in Vanuatu. The Vanuatu National Prevalence Study of 2010 reports that at least 60 % of the women experience physical or sexual violence and 30% experience childhood sexual abuse while under the age of 15 years. During a crisis situation, this violence is exacerbated. Aditi Ghosh, Acting Director, IPPF-SPRINT joined the VFHA team on their mission to the devastated Tanna Island. “The journey to Tanna was along a long, rocky mud track through deserted woodland, called the land of wild horses. Finally, after two hours, we reached a small village called Launatke, which had a few thatched houses scattered around the forest. We were welcomed warmly by locals. They sang a cyclone Pam song for us in local Launatke tribal language “the power of the storm was so strong that it destroyed everything…”. The VFHA team had turned a youth centre into a medical clinic. We listened to people telling us about the hardships they had faced during the cyclone. Julia, a young women in early 20’s– a mother of four, told us that she conceived her second baby immediately after she stopped breast feeding her first and the same pattern was repeated with the following two pregnancies. Her youngest child was five months old and she was worried she would get pregnant again …… but the cyclone gave her the opportunity get advice from the VFHA nurses. Now, she said, she can focus on taking care of her four young children without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. We heard many similar stories throughout the afternoon. Next morning, we woke to thundering rain and a blanket of thick fog. We were headed for Labasilis village – a three hour trek through hills and forest. The medicine and supplies were packed in a waterproof bag and we set off - a team of seven including two doctors and two nurses. Keeping balance in slippery mud was a real challenge, everyone decided to walk barefoot for better grip. I was relieved to learn that Tanna doesn’t have poisonous insects or snakes. On our way, a team member told us that pregnant women have to be carried along this road, and then taken by truck the nearest clinic. How do these women survive through this journey? Not surprising that most women prefer to deliver at the village with the help of local (and untrained) birth attendants. No sterilized knives to cut the umbilical cord, instead they use sharpened bamboo. We heard an amazing story of resiliance .. like the one about the woman who while working on her field suddenly felt labor pains. She came back home, delivered on her own, covered the baby with a cloth at home and returned to the field to finish her work. After two hours we reached Loeala vama. I could see a few makeshift tarpaulin houses, a few damaged thatched houses. After providing some quick services in that village, we continued our walk along the slippery road towards our destination.   The fog has become thicker now, covering the whole area. It was difficult to see even the team members ahead of me. Finally, after another hour of we reached our final destination – Labasilis village. There was an UNICEF tent, where we started to set up our outreach medical camp. Though it was an open tent, we partitioned a corner with a cloth for privacy. Soon I could see a stream of people coming towards us, over the hills. I was told that the surrounding villages had been informed about today’s camp and permission to visit given by the village chiefs. That day we saw more than 190 clients – treating a range of ailments from cold, fever, wounds, pneumonia to pregnancy tests, newborn, antenatal and postnatal check-ups, plus family planning counseling and services. We saw many young parents- many with four or more children. Someone joked that here boys will have babies before they have beards. We could see for ourselves, how true that was. I also noticed a young shy pregnant woman, with small baby on her lap, who quietly asked the nurse if she could talk to her in private. Her name was Natalie. She had been prescribed Jadelle (Long Acting Reversible Contraception), when she visited the clinic two months ago. But, when she returned to her village, people scared her by saying the medicine was for wild horses and somehow they removed the Jadelle implant from her arm. And now she is again pregnant, unwillingly. Heading back to the airport in the pouring rain I thought about wild horses, old wives tales and how Natalie will cope with her new pregnancy.

vanuatu
news_item

| 27 August 2015

Cyclone Pam hits The Happiest Place on Earth: Humanitarian Mission to Vanuatu Open Primary tabs configuration options Primary tabs

The Happy Planet Index has declared Vanuatu Archipelago ‘the happiest place on earth’ with its picturesque shoreline and friendly people. But unfortunately, Vanuatu - the Land Eternal- is a country with one of the highest disaster risks in the world. On Friday 13th of March 2015 cyclone PAM hit Vanuatu's southern provinces of Shefa and Tafea, causing widespread devastation. International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), through its SPRINT initiative (supported by DFAT of Australian government), immediately responded providing life-saving reproductive health services with the help of its Member Association- Vanuatu Family Health Association (VFHA). The VFHA team, with Vanuatu Ministry of Health and United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), established medical and reproductive health camps in the islands (North Tanna, Epi, North Efate) and remote villages. After the cyclone struck, the island people were left without any access to healthcare, leaving pregnant women especially vulnerable. Around the world, it is estimated that 60% of maternal deaths and 45% of newborn deaths take place in fragile contexts. So, many of these Vanuatu women and their babies are at high risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, violence against women and girls is a growing social and economic issue in Vanuatu. The Vanuatu National Prevalence Study of 2010 reports that at least 60 % of the women experience physical or sexual violence and 30% experience childhood sexual abuse while under the age of 15 years. During a crisis situation, this violence is exacerbated. Aditi Ghosh, Acting Director, IPPF-SPRINT joined the VFHA team on their mission to the devastated Tanna Island. “The journey to Tanna was along a long, rocky mud track through deserted woodland, called the land of wild horses. Finally, after two hours, we reached a small village called Launatke, which had a few thatched houses scattered around the forest. We were welcomed warmly by locals. They sang a cyclone Pam song for us in local Launatke tribal language “the power of the storm was so strong that it destroyed everything…”. The VFHA team had turned a youth centre into a medical clinic. We listened to people telling us about the hardships they had faced during the cyclone. Julia, a young women in early 20’s– a mother of four, told us that she conceived her second baby immediately after she stopped breast feeding her first and the same pattern was repeated with the following two pregnancies. Her youngest child was five months old and she was worried she would get pregnant again …… but the cyclone gave her the opportunity get advice from the VFHA nurses. Now, she said, she can focus on taking care of her four young children without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. We heard many similar stories throughout the afternoon. Next morning, we woke to thundering rain and a blanket of thick fog. We were headed for Labasilis village – a three hour trek through hills and forest. The medicine and supplies were packed in a waterproof bag and we set off - a team of seven including two doctors and two nurses. Keeping balance in slippery mud was a real challenge, everyone decided to walk barefoot for better grip. I was relieved to learn that Tanna doesn’t have poisonous insects or snakes. On our way, a team member told us that pregnant women have to be carried along this road, and then taken by truck the nearest clinic. How do these women survive through this journey? Not surprising that most women prefer to deliver at the village with the help of local (and untrained) birth attendants. No sterilized knives to cut the umbilical cord, instead they use sharpened bamboo. We heard an amazing story of resiliance .. like the one about the woman who while working on her field suddenly felt labor pains. She came back home, delivered on her own, covered the baby with a cloth at home and returned to the field to finish her work. After two hours we reached Loeala vama. I could see a few makeshift tarpaulin houses, a few damaged thatched houses. After providing some quick services in that village, we continued our walk along the slippery road towards our destination.   The fog has become thicker now, covering the whole area. It was difficult to see even the team members ahead of me. Finally, after another hour of we reached our final destination – Labasilis village. There was an UNICEF tent, where we started to set up our outreach medical camp. Though it was an open tent, we partitioned a corner with a cloth for privacy. Soon I could see a stream of people coming towards us, over the hills. I was told that the surrounding villages had been informed about today’s camp and permission to visit given by the village chiefs. That day we saw more than 190 clients – treating a range of ailments from cold, fever, wounds, pneumonia to pregnancy tests, newborn, antenatal and postnatal check-ups, plus family planning counseling and services. We saw many young parents- many with four or more children. Someone joked that here boys will have babies before they have beards. We could see for ourselves, how true that was. I also noticed a young shy pregnant woman, with small baby on her lap, who quietly asked the nurse if she could talk to her in private. Her name was Natalie. She had been prescribed Jadelle (Long Acting Reversible Contraception), when she visited the clinic two months ago. But, when she returned to her village, people scared her by saying the medicine was for wild horses and somehow they removed the Jadelle implant from her arm. And now she is again pregnant, unwillingly. Heading back to the airport in the pouring rain I thought about wild horses, old wives tales and how Natalie will cope with her new pregnancy.

solomon islands
news item

| 11 October 2016

New cooperation with Solomon Island Government to grant IPPF role as executing agency

The Government of Solomon Islands agreed to cooperate with International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) this week to advance the work on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) across its provinces. The Prime Minister announced its commitment to improve SRHR for all by 2020 and a partnership role with IPPF. In the first of a series of meetings between Ministers and high level government officials across the Pacific and Australia this month, IPPF Director General and Acting Solomon Islands Prime Minister Hon. Manasseh Maelanga brokered a partnership which will see the Federation designated as an executing agency on behalf of the Government of the Solomon Islands to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights of all people across the provinces. IPPF Director General, Tewodros Melesse said:  “This is a great step for the Government and IPPF. Our Member Association, Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association, has been working diligently to improve the lives of people across the Solomon Islands through a range of much needed services. Through this extensive partnership arrangement we can take that work to the next level to improve access, increase the range and quality of Government services and integrate our expertise to better the lives of people across the Solomon Islands.  This focus will ensure services reach those who are poor, marginalized and socially excluded and wherever there is a need”. IPPF’s Member Association - Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association will work closely with the Government to convene meetings across provinces with national ministries, non-governmental and faith based groups and medical associations to advise and prepare a budgeted action plan to help realize sexual and reproductive health and rights for all by 2020. The cooperation will see IPPF play a large role in supporting and representing the interests of the Solomon Islands with key international multilateral and bilateral donors, including the African-Caribbean-Pacific Group of States to support the implementation of these plans, to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and rights.  

solomon islands
news_item

| 14 March 2014

New cooperation with Solomon Island Government to grant IPPF role as executing agency

The Government of Solomon Islands agreed to cooperate with International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) this week to advance the work on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) across its provinces. The Prime Minister announced its commitment to improve SRHR for all by 2020 and a partnership role with IPPF. In the first of a series of meetings between Ministers and high level government officials across the Pacific and Australia this month, IPPF Director General and Acting Solomon Islands Prime Minister Hon. Manasseh Maelanga brokered a partnership which will see the Federation designated as an executing agency on behalf of the Government of the Solomon Islands to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights of all people across the provinces. IPPF Director General, Tewodros Melesse said:  “This is a great step for the Government and IPPF. Our Member Association, Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association, has been working diligently to improve the lives of people across the Solomon Islands through a range of much needed services. Through this extensive partnership arrangement we can take that work to the next level to improve access, increase the range and quality of Government services and integrate our expertise to better the lives of people across the Solomon Islands.  This focus will ensure services reach those who are poor, marginalized and socially excluded and wherever there is a need”. IPPF’s Member Association - Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association will work closely with the Government to convene meetings across provinces with national ministries, non-governmental and faith based groups and medical associations to advise and prepare a budgeted action plan to help realize sexual and reproductive health and rights for all by 2020. The cooperation will see IPPF play a large role in supporting and representing the interests of the Solomon Islands with key international multilateral and bilateral donors, including the African-Caribbean-Pacific Group of States to support the implementation of these plans, to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and rights.  

IPPF contraception supply disrupted
news item

| 16 April 2020

Contraception and COVID-19: Disrupted supply and access

Globally, the unmet need for contraception remains too high. It’s estimated that 214 million women and girls are not using modern contraception, despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. And this was before the COVID-19 pandemic, which is set to further derail access to contraception for women and girls around the world. Disrupted supply chains Lockdown measures taken globally to respond to COVID-19 are bringing major disruptions to contraceptive supply chains. Large manufacturers of contraceptives in Asia have had to halt production or operate at reduced capacity, and we may see similar developments in other regions as COVID-19 takes hold. For example, the world’s largest condom producer – Malaysia’s Karex Bhd – which makes one in every five condoms globally, was forced to close for a week in March and only given permission to reopen at 50% capacity. Production of IUDs in India – a major global producer of IUDs – has come to a standstill with the Indian government also curtailing export of any product containing progesterone, a key component of a number of contraceptives. In addition to this, the closures of borders and other restrictions imposed in the face of COVID-19 further affect the shipping and distribution of commodities. Delays in the production and delivery of contraceptive supplies at global and national levels will lead to stockouts of supplies, severely impacting contraceptive access. Disrupted access Beyond this, at country level, sexual and reproductive health services, staffing and funds may be diverted to support COVID-19 responses, leaving women and girls unable to access contraceptive and other sexual and reproductive health care. Provision of sexual and reproductive health services will also be affected by infection prevention measures, including health workers’ access to personal protective equipment (PPE). Yet, this is just part of the picture. Even where contraceptives are available and continue to be provided through clinics or pharmacies, the impact of COVID-19 on women’s and girls’ lives will curtail their access in multiple other ways. Quarantine measures and mobility restrictions will affect women’s and girls’ ability to seek out contraceptive services. Financial insecurity and additional caregiving burdens brought on by lockdown measures will be further impediments. Marginalized populations will face additional barriers. What’s the impact for our clinics on the ground? In 2018, we delivered 81.2 million contraceptive services and distributed over 300 million condoms through our Member Associations (MAs). Contraceptive care, either through clinics or outreach programs, makes up the largest portion of our service provision to communities by far. Now, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are receiving concerning updates from our MAs who are worried about impacts on supply chains and their ability to operate. 5,633 static and mobile clinics and community-based care outlets have already closed because of the outbreak, across 64 countries. They make up 14% of the total service delivery points IPPF members ran in 2018. For MAs that are still running limited services, an immediate need is PPE. Where does this leave us? At IPPF, supporting all our MAs through this pandemic is our priority. We are working to understand the stresses being placed on our MAs and to deliver as much direct support as possible. We actively monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the supply of contraceptives and other sexual and reproductive health commodities, and work with partners and manufacturers to do what we can to meet MAs’ needs – including for PPE – and ensure continued availability of supplies. We are also working to identify opportunities to modernize our service offering to respond to the rapidly changing landscape, with a view to expanding no touch and digital services and self-management of care, and make a strong case for additional resourcing in these challenging times. And we are calling on others – national governments, donors and international agencies – to recognize sexual and reproductive healthcare, including contraceptive services, as essential in this crisis, and to take measures to address disruptions in supply chains and ensure continued service provision at national level. If women, girls and marginalized communities cannot access contraceptive care in this crisis, we can expect to see a rise in unintended and forced pregnancies, an increase in sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and, ultimately, a sharp rise in unsafe abortions. The impacts on women’s and girls’ lives now, and beyond this crisis, will be severe.

IPPF contraception supply disrupted
news_item

| 16 April 2020

Contraception and COVID-19: Disrupted supply and access

Globally, the unmet need for contraception remains too high. It’s estimated that 214 million women and girls are not using modern contraception, despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. And this was before the COVID-19 pandemic, which is set to further derail access to contraception for women and girls around the world. Disrupted supply chains Lockdown measures taken globally to respond to COVID-19 are bringing major disruptions to contraceptive supply chains. Large manufacturers of contraceptives in Asia have had to halt production or operate at reduced capacity, and we may see similar developments in other regions as COVID-19 takes hold. For example, the world’s largest condom producer – Malaysia’s Karex Bhd – which makes one in every five condoms globally, was forced to close for a week in March and only given permission to reopen at 50% capacity. Production of IUDs in India – a major global producer of IUDs – has come to a standstill with the Indian government also curtailing export of any product containing progesterone, a key component of a number of contraceptives. In addition to this, the closures of borders and other restrictions imposed in the face of COVID-19 further affect the shipping and distribution of commodities. Delays in the production and delivery of contraceptive supplies at global and national levels will lead to stockouts of supplies, severely impacting contraceptive access. Disrupted access Beyond this, at country level, sexual and reproductive health services, staffing and funds may be diverted to support COVID-19 responses, leaving women and girls unable to access contraceptive and other sexual and reproductive health care. Provision of sexual and reproductive health services will also be affected by infection prevention measures, including health workers’ access to personal protective equipment (PPE). Yet, this is just part of the picture. Even where contraceptives are available and continue to be provided through clinics or pharmacies, the impact of COVID-19 on women’s and girls’ lives will curtail their access in multiple other ways. Quarantine measures and mobility restrictions will affect women’s and girls’ ability to seek out contraceptive services. Financial insecurity and additional caregiving burdens brought on by lockdown measures will be further impediments. Marginalized populations will face additional barriers. What’s the impact for our clinics on the ground? In 2018, we delivered 81.2 million contraceptive services and distributed over 300 million condoms through our Member Associations (MAs). Contraceptive care, either through clinics or outreach programs, makes up the largest portion of our service provision to communities by far. Now, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are receiving concerning updates from our MAs who are worried about impacts on supply chains and their ability to operate. 5,633 static and mobile clinics and community-based care outlets have already closed because of the outbreak, across 64 countries. They make up 14% of the total service delivery points IPPF members ran in 2018. For MAs that are still running limited services, an immediate need is PPE. Where does this leave us? At IPPF, supporting all our MAs through this pandemic is our priority. We are working to understand the stresses being placed on our MAs and to deliver as much direct support as possible. We actively monitor the impact of COVID-19 on the supply of contraceptives and other sexual and reproductive health commodities, and work with partners and manufacturers to do what we can to meet MAs’ needs – including for PPE – and ensure continued availability of supplies. We are also working to identify opportunities to modernize our service offering to respond to the rapidly changing landscape, with a view to expanding no touch and digital services and self-management of care, and make a strong case for additional resourcing in these challenging times. And we are calling on others – national governments, donors and international agencies – to recognize sexual and reproductive healthcare, including contraceptive services, as essential in this crisis, and to take measures to address disruptions in supply chains and ensure continued service provision at national level. If women, girls and marginalized communities cannot access contraceptive care in this crisis, we can expect to see a rise in unintended and forced pregnancies, an increase in sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and, ultimately, a sharp rise in unsafe abortions. The impacts on women’s and girls’ lives now, and beyond this crisis, will be severe.

Contraceptives counseling in SIPPA clinic
news item

| 28 June 2017

SIPPA appointed as CSO Focal Point for FP2020

The Solomon Islands government took a significant step in addressing the family planning service delivery programme in the country by strengthening partnership with the civil society. In its latest move, the Ministry of Health and Medical Services tapped Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association (SIPPA), an IPPF member association, to be the CSO focal point to help mobilize the civil society sector towards the achievement of Solomon Islands’ FP2020 target. The Solomon Islands failed to reach the national target for contraceptive rate set in 2015. The target of 55% CPR is double the current rate of 27% which has stayed at that rate for about a decade. The high unmet need can be attributed to various factors, which include: young people’s lack of information to make the right choices; women, men, and youth’s lack of access to FP services and commodities; lack of skilled staff and health service providers. By bringing SIPPA into the action, the Government of Solomon Islands will benefit from IPPF’s and SIPPA’s strong youth program, data collection, management, and analysis infrastructure, and technical expertise in comprehensive sexuality education and HIV/STI program. The commitments made on behalf of the Government of Solomon Islands on July 11, 2012 are (1) to make family planning a priority under the reproductive health program section of the government National Health Strategic Plan for 2006-2015 and (2) to make men partners in all reproductive health issues, including voluntary family planning.  

Contraceptives counseling in SIPPA clinic
news_item

| 28 June 2017

SIPPA appointed as CSO Focal Point for FP2020

The Solomon Islands government took a significant step in addressing the family planning service delivery programme in the country by strengthening partnership with the civil society. In its latest move, the Ministry of Health and Medical Services tapped Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association (SIPPA), an IPPF member association, to be the CSO focal point to help mobilize the civil society sector towards the achievement of Solomon Islands’ FP2020 target. The Solomon Islands failed to reach the national target for contraceptive rate set in 2015. The target of 55% CPR is double the current rate of 27% which has stayed at that rate for about a decade. The high unmet need can be attributed to various factors, which include: young people’s lack of information to make the right choices; women, men, and youth’s lack of access to FP services and commodities; lack of skilled staff and health service providers. By bringing SIPPA into the action, the Government of Solomon Islands will benefit from IPPF’s and SIPPA’s strong youth program, data collection, management, and analysis infrastructure, and technical expertise in comprehensive sexuality education and HIV/STI program. The commitments made on behalf of the Government of Solomon Islands on July 11, 2012 are (1) to make family planning a priority under the reproductive health program section of the government National Health Strategic Plan for 2006-2015 and (2) to make men partners in all reproductive health issues, including voluntary family planning.  

vanuatu
news item

| 27 August 2015

Cyclone Pam hits The Happiest Place on Earth: Humanitarian Mission to Vanuatu Open Primary tabs configuration options Primary tabs

The Happy Planet Index has declared Vanuatu Archipelago ‘the happiest place on earth’ with its picturesque shoreline and friendly people. But unfortunately, Vanuatu - the Land Eternal- is a country with one of the highest disaster risks in the world. On Friday 13th of March 2015 cyclone PAM hit Vanuatu's southern provinces of Shefa and Tafea, causing widespread devastation. International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), through its SPRINT initiative (supported by DFAT of Australian government), immediately responded providing life-saving reproductive health services with the help of its Member Association- Vanuatu Family Health Association (VFHA). The VFHA team, with Vanuatu Ministry of Health and United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), established medical and reproductive health camps in the islands (North Tanna, Epi, North Efate) and remote villages. After the cyclone struck, the island people were left without any access to healthcare, leaving pregnant women especially vulnerable. Around the world, it is estimated that 60% of maternal deaths and 45% of newborn deaths take place in fragile contexts. So, many of these Vanuatu women and their babies are at high risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, violence against women and girls is a growing social and economic issue in Vanuatu. The Vanuatu National Prevalence Study of 2010 reports that at least 60 % of the women experience physical or sexual violence and 30% experience childhood sexual abuse while under the age of 15 years. During a crisis situation, this violence is exacerbated. Aditi Ghosh, Acting Director, IPPF-SPRINT joined the VFHA team on their mission to the devastated Tanna Island. “The journey to Tanna was along a long, rocky mud track through deserted woodland, called the land of wild horses. Finally, after two hours, we reached a small village called Launatke, which had a few thatched houses scattered around the forest. We were welcomed warmly by locals. They sang a cyclone Pam song for us in local Launatke tribal language “the power of the storm was so strong that it destroyed everything…”. The VFHA team had turned a youth centre into a medical clinic. We listened to people telling us about the hardships they had faced during the cyclone. Julia, a young women in early 20’s– a mother of four, told us that she conceived her second baby immediately after she stopped breast feeding her first and the same pattern was repeated with the following two pregnancies. Her youngest child was five months old and she was worried she would get pregnant again …… but the cyclone gave her the opportunity get advice from the VFHA nurses. Now, she said, she can focus on taking care of her four young children without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. We heard many similar stories throughout the afternoon. Next morning, we woke to thundering rain and a blanket of thick fog. We were headed for Labasilis village – a three hour trek through hills and forest. The medicine and supplies were packed in a waterproof bag and we set off - a team of seven including two doctors and two nurses. Keeping balance in slippery mud was a real challenge, everyone decided to walk barefoot for better grip. I was relieved to learn that Tanna doesn’t have poisonous insects or snakes. On our way, a team member told us that pregnant women have to be carried along this road, and then taken by truck the nearest clinic. How do these women survive through this journey? Not surprising that most women prefer to deliver at the village with the help of local (and untrained) birth attendants. No sterilized knives to cut the umbilical cord, instead they use sharpened bamboo. We heard an amazing story of resiliance .. like the one about the woman who while working on her field suddenly felt labor pains. She came back home, delivered on her own, covered the baby with a cloth at home and returned to the field to finish her work. After two hours we reached Loeala vama. I could see a few makeshift tarpaulin houses, a few damaged thatched houses. After providing some quick services in that village, we continued our walk along the slippery road towards our destination.   The fog has become thicker now, covering the whole area. It was difficult to see even the team members ahead of me. Finally, after another hour of we reached our final destination – Labasilis village. There was an UNICEF tent, where we started to set up our outreach medical camp. Though it was an open tent, we partitioned a corner with a cloth for privacy. Soon I could see a stream of people coming towards us, over the hills. I was told that the surrounding villages had been informed about today’s camp and permission to visit given by the village chiefs. That day we saw more than 190 clients – treating a range of ailments from cold, fever, wounds, pneumonia to pregnancy tests, newborn, antenatal and postnatal check-ups, plus family planning counseling and services. We saw many young parents- many with four or more children. Someone joked that here boys will have babies before they have beards. We could see for ourselves, how true that was. I also noticed a young shy pregnant woman, with small baby on her lap, who quietly asked the nurse if she could talk to her in private. Her name was Natalie. She had been prescribed Jadelle (Long Acting Reversible Contraception), when she visited the clinic two months ago. But, when she returned to her village, people scared her by saying the medicine was for wild horses and somehow they removed the Jadelle implant from her arm. And now she is again pregnant, unwillingly. Heading back to the airport in the pouring rain I thought about wild horses, old wives tales and how Natalie will cope with her new pregnancy.

vanuatu
news_item

| 27 August 2015

Cyclone Pam hits The Happiest Place on Earth: Humanitarian Mission to Vanuatu Open Primary tabs configuration options Primary tabs

The Happy Planet Index has declared Vanuatu Archipelago ‘the happiest place on earth’ with its picturesque shoreline and friendly people. But unfortunately, Vanuatu - the Land Eternal- is a country with one of the highest disaster risks in the world. On Friday 13th of March 2015 cyclone PAM hit Vanuatu's southern provinces of Shefa and Tafea, causing widespread devastation. International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), through its SPRINT initiative (supported by DFAT of Australian government), immediately responded providing life-saving reproductive health services with the help of its Member Association- Vanuatu Family Health Association (VFHA). The VFHA team, with Vanuatu Ministry of Health and United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA), established medical and reproductive health camps in the islands (North Tanna, Epi, North Efate) and remote villages. After the cyclone struck, the island people were left without any access to healthcare, leaving pregnant women especially vulnerable. Around the world, it is estimated that 60% of maternal deaths and 45% of newborn deaths take place in fragile contexts. So, many of these Vanuatu women and their babies are at high risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, violence against women and girls is a growing social and economic issue in Vanuatu. The Vanuatu National Prevalence Study of 2010 reports that at least 60 % of the women experience physical or sexual violence and 30% experience childhood sexual abuse while under the age of 15 years. During a crisis situation, this violence is exacerbated. Aditi Ghosh, Acting Director, IPPF-SPRINT joined the VFHA team on their mission to the devastated Tanna Island. “The journey to Tanna was along a long, rocky mud track through deserted woodland, called the land of wild horses. Finally, after two hours, we reached a small village called Launatke, which had a few thatched houses scattered around the forest. We were welcomed warmly by locals. They sang a cyclone Pam song for us in local Launatke tribal language “the power of the storm was so strong that it destroyed everything…”. The VFHA team had turned a youth centre into a medical clinic. We listened to people telling us about the hardships they had faced during the cyclone. Julia, a young women in early 20’s– a mother of four, told us that she conceived her second baby immediately after she stopped breast feeding her first and the same pattern was repeated with the following two pregnancies. Her youngest child was five months old and she was worried she would get pregnant again …… but the cyclone gave her the opportunity get advice from the VFHA nurses. Now, she said, she can focus on taking care of her four young children without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. We heard many similar stories throughout the afternoon. Next morning, we woke to thundering rain and a blanket of thick fog. We were headed for Labasilis village – a three hour trek through hills and forest. The medicine and supplies were packed in a waterproof bag and we set off - a team of seven including two doctors and two nurses. Keeping balance in slippery mud was a real challenge, everyone decided to walk barefoot for better grip. I was relieved to learn that Tanna doesn’t have poisonous insects or snakes. On our way, a team member told us that pregnant women have to be carried along this road, and then taken by truck the nearest clinic. How do these women survive through this journey? Not surprising that most women prefer to deliver at the village with the help of local (and untrained) birth attendants. No sterilized knives to cut the umbilical cord, instead they use sharpened bamboo. We heard an amazing story of resiliance .. like the one about the woman who while working on her field suddenly felt labor pains. She came back home, delivered on her own, covered the baby with a cloth at home and returned to the field to finish her work. After two hours we reached Loeala vama. I could see a few makeshift tarpaulin houses, a few damaged thatched houses. After providing some quick services in that village, we continued our walk along the slippery road towards our destination.   The fog has become thicker now, covering the whole area. It was difficult to see even the team members ahead of me. Finally, after another hour of we reached our final destination – Labasilis village. There was an UNICEF tent, where we started to set up our outreach medical camp. Though it was an open tent, we partitioned a corner with a cloth for privacy. Soon I could see a stream of people coming towards us, over the hills. I was told that the surrounding villages had been informed about today’s camp and permission to visit given by the village chiefs. That day we saw more than 190 clients – treating a range of ailments from cold, fever, wounds, pneumonia to pregnancy tests, newborn, antenatal and postnatal check-ups, plus family planning counseling and services. We saw many young parents- many with four or more children. Someone joked that here boys will have babies before they have beards. We could see for ourselves, how true that was. I also noticed a young shy pregnant woman, with small baby on her lap, who quietly asked the nurse if she could talk to her in private. Her name was Natalie. She had been prescribed Jadelle (Long Acting Reversible Contraception), when she visited the clinic two months ago. But, when she returned to her village, people scared her by saying the medicine was for wild horses and somehow they removed the Jadelle implant from her arm. And now she is again pregnant, unwillingly. Heading back to the airport in the pouring rain I thought about wild horses, old wives tales and how Natalie will cope with her new pregnancy.

solomon islands
news item

| 11 October 2016

New cooperation with Solomon Island Government to grant IPPF role as executing agency

The Government of Solomon Islands agreed to cooperate with International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) this week to advance the work on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) across its provinces. The Prime Minister announced its commitment to improve SRHR for all by 2020 and a partnership role with IPPF. In the first of a series of meetings between Ministers and high level government officials across the Pacific and Australia this month, IPPF Director General and Acting Solomon Islands Prime Minister Hon. Manasseh Maelanga brokered a partnership which will see the Federation designated as an executing agency on behalf of the Government of the Solomon Islands to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights of all people across the provinces. IPPF Director General, Tewodros Melesse said:  “This is a great step for the Government and IPPF. Our Member Association, Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association, has been working diligently to improve the lives of people across the Solomon Islands through a range of much needed services. Through this extensive partnership arrangement we can take that work to the next level to improve access, increase the range and quality of Government services and integrate our expertise to better the lives of people across the Solomon Islands.  This focus will ensure services reach those who are poor, marginalized and socially excluded and wherever there is a need”. IPPF’s Member Association - Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association will work closely with the Government to convene meetings across provinces with national ministries, non-governmental and faith based groups and medical associations to advise and prepare a budgeted action plan to help realize sexual and reproductive health and rights for all by 2020. The cooperation will see IPPF play a large role in supporting and representing the interests of the Solomon Islands with key international multilateral and bilateral donors, including the African-Caribbean-Pacific Group of States to support the implementation of these plans, to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and rights.  

solomon islands
news_item

| 14 March 2014

New cooperation with Solomon Island Government to grant IPPF role as executing agency

The Government of Solomon Islands agreed to cooperate with International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) this week to advance the work on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) across its provinces. The Prime Minister announced its commitment to improve SRHR for all by 2020 and a partnership role with IPPF. In the first of a series of meetings between Ministers and high level government officials across the Pacific and Australia this month, IPPF Director General and Acting Solomon Islands Prime Minister Hon. Manasseh Maelanga brokered a partnership which will see the Federation designated as an executing agency on behalf of the Government of the Solomon Islands to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights of all people across the provinces. IPPF Director General, Tewodros Melesse said:  “This is a great step for the Government and IPPF. Our Member Association, Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association, has been working diligently to improve the lives of people across the Solomon Islands through a range of much needed services. Through this extensive partnership arrangement we can take that work to the next level to improve access, increase the range and quality of Government services and integrate our expertise to better the lives of people across the Solomon Islands.  This focus will ensure services reach those who are poor, marginalized and socially excluded and wherever there is a need”. IPPF’s Member Association - Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association will work closely with the Government to convene meetings across provinces with national ministries, non-governmental and faith based groups and medical associations to advise and prepare a budgeted action plan to help realize sexual and reproductive health and rights for all by 2020. The cooperation will see IPPF play a large role in supporting and representing the interests of the Solomon Islands with key international multilateral and bilateral donors, including the African-Caribbean-Pacific Group of States to support the implementation of these plans, to strengthen sexual and reproductive health and rights.